CIMS Cameras

The next meeting of the CIMS Camera  Oversight Committee will be Monday, January 23rd at 5:00pm in the BPD Community Room, 350 Washington Street, Brookline

Overview


The CIMS Camera Oversight Committee has submitted its final report to the Board of Selectmen. Included in the report is an updated log of requests to review/retain footage, policies related to the use of the cameras and an analysis of their use conducted by the BPD.

Two times a year, the Brookline Police Department will conduct an analysis of the CIMS usage and prepare a report to the CIMS Camera Oversight Committee and the Board of Selectmen. Click the following for 2011 end of the year report  the Chief's Coverletter to the Camera Committee, the logs of CIMS video recorded/retained, CIMS overrides and incidents missed during off hours.

Map of locations of the eleven CIMS Cameras

2014 Reports:

Mid Year CIMS Report
Mid Year Incidents & Requests
Mid Year Overrides
Mid Year Off Camera Incidents

2015 Reports:
Mid Year CIMS Report
Year End CIMS Report

2016 Reports: 
Mid Year CIMS Report

All CIM related reports could be found by clicking here

Meeting Minutes from previous meetings:

11/2/2009   12/2/2009   1/26/2010   3/23/2010        

4/22/2010   9/21/2010  10/17/2011  2/26/2013 
       
1/28/2014    8/5/2014    5/18/2016
      

Critical Infrastructure Monitoring System (CIMS) Program


 
Since early 2009, the Brookline Police Department has operated and maintained a fixed video camera monitoring system within the jurisdiction of the Town of Brookline to monitor major thoroughfares and evacuation routes that are deemed critical infrastructure as part of the Critical Infrastructure Monitoring System (CIMS) of the Metro-Boston Homeland Security Region (MBHSR). The CIMS program is comprised of similar systems operated and maintained by the nine (9) municipalities within the MBHSR (in addition to Brookline, these are Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Quincy, Revere, Somerville, and Winthrop).

The purpose of the CIMS program is to enhance the management of emergency situations, detect and deter terrorism, and otherwise protect the health, safety and welfare of those who live and work in, visit, and transact business with the Town.

The CIMS program may also be used to deter criminal activity and public disorder, reduce fear of crime, identify criminal activity and suspects, identify and gather possible evidence for use in criminal and civil court actions, document police actions, safeguard citizen and police officer rights, aid in Amber alerts or in the search for lost / missing children or elderly people, assist emergency services personnel when responding to incidents, assist with the monitoring of traffic conditions, otherwise assist town officials with the provision of municipal services in order to enhance overall municipal efficiency, and assist with the training of Department personnel. The Brookline CIMS shall not be used to replace current policing techniques. Instead, it is to be used to supplement proven policing techniques and assist in the delivery of public safety and municipal services.

The CIMS program began in early 2009, operating on a 24 hour a day/7 day a week basis. Following a lengthy period of public review and comment, Chief Daniel O'Leary proposed a more restricted use of the cameras, with the system operating on a daily basis from 10pm to 6am, while retaining the Department's discretion to use these cameras for preplanned events, criminal investigations and the other reasons listed in the previous paragraph. This revised plan also turned over one of the 12 cameras to Boston, the jurisdiction where the camera resides (Cleveland Circle).


This decision was based on a two-fold review of the CIMS program – 1) a compromised position to satisfy some residents' concerns of a "police state" where they live under 24/7 governmental surveillance and 2) an analysis of the instances where the footage proved to be most helpful to the Department and the Town in achieving our mission to reduce crime and improve the quality of life for our residents by providing assistance in investigating a crime, conducting traffic analysis, managing events, etc.


CIMS Camera Oversight Committee

Jack Corrigan

Susan Howard

Sam Scott

Ian Polumbaum

Harry Chaveriat

9/21/2010    10/17/2011  2/26/2013

4/20/2010    3/23/2010    1/26/2010    

12/2/2009    11/2/2009    

Critical Infrastructure Monitoring System (CIMS) Program
 

Since early 2009, the Brookline Police Department has operated and maintained a fixed video camera monitoring system within the jurisdiction of the Town of Brookline to monitor major thoroughfares and evacuation routes that are deemed critical infrastructure as part of the Critical Infrastructure Monitoring System (CIMS) of the Metro-Boston Homeland Security Region (MBHSR). The CIMS program is comprised of similar systems operated and maintained by the nine (9) municipalities within the MBHSR (in addition to Brookline, these are Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Quincy, Revere, Somerville, and Winthrop).

The purpose of the CIMS program is to enhance the management of emergency situations, detect and deter terrorism, and otherwise protect the health, safety and welfare of those who live and work in, visit, and transact business with the Town.

The CIMS program may also be used to deter criminal activity and public disorder, reduce fear of crime, identify criminal activity and suspects, identify and gather possible evidence for use in criminal and civil court actions, document police actions, safeguard citizen and police officer rights, aid in Amber alerts or in the search for lost / missing children or elderly people, assist emergency services personnel when responding to incidents, assist with the monitoring of traffic conditions, otherwise assist town officials with the provision of municipal services in order to enhance overall municipal efficiency, and assist with the training of Department personnel. The Brookline CIMS shall not be used to replace current policing techniques. Instead, it is to be used to supplement proven policing techniques and assist in the delivery of public safety and municipal services.

The CIMS program began in early 2009, operating on a 24 hour a day/7 day a week basis. Following a lengthy period of public review and comment, Chief Daniel O'Leary proposed a more restricted use of the cameras, with the system operating on a daily basis from 10pm to 6am, while retaining the Department's discretion to use these cameras for preplanned events, criminal investigations and the other reasons listed in the previous paragraph. This revised plan also turned over one of the 12 cameras to Boston, the jurisdiction where the camera resides (Cleveland Circle).

This decision was based on a two-fold review of the CIMS program – 1) a compromised position to satisfy some residents' concerns of a "police state" where they live under 24/7 governmental surveillance and 2) an analysis of the instances where the footage proved to be most helpful to the Department and the Town in achieving our mission to reduce crime and improve the quality of life for our residents by providing assistance in investigating a crime, conducting traffic analysis, managing events, etc.

CIMS Camera Oversight Committee

Jack Corrigan

Susan Howard

Sam Scott

Ian Polumbaum

9/21/2010    10/17/2011  2/26/2013

4/20/2010    3/23/2010    1/26/2010    

12/2/2009    11/2/2009    

Critical Infrastructure Monitoring System (CIMS) Program
 

Since early 2009, the Brookline Police Department has operated and maintained a fixed video camera monitoring system within the jurisdiction of the Town of Brookline to monitor major thoroughfares and evacuation routes that are deemed critical infrastructure as part of the Critical Infrastructure Monitoring System (CIMS) of the Metro-Boston Homeland Security Region (MBHSR). The CIMS program is comprised of similar systems operated and maintained by the nine (9) municipalities within the MBHSR (in addition to Brookline, these are Boston, Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Quincy, Revere, Somerville, and Winthrop).

The purpose of the CIMS program is to enhance the management of emergency situations, detect and deter terrorism, and otherwise protect the health, safety and welfare of those who live and work in, visit, and transact business with the Town.

The CIMS program may also be used to deter criminal activity and public disorder, reduce fear of crime, identify criminal activity and suspects, identify and gather possible evidence for use in criminal and civil court actions, document police actions, safeguard citizen and police officer rights, aid in Amber alerts or in the search for lost / missing children or elderly people, assist emergency services personnel when responding to incidents, assist with the monitoring of traffic conditions, otherwise assist town officials with the provision of municipal services in order to enhance overall municipal efficiency, and assist with the training of Department personnel. The Brookline CIMS shall not be used to replace current policing techniques. Instead, it is to be used to supplement proven policing techniques and assist in the delivery of public safety and municipal services.

The CIMS program began in early 2009, operating on a 24 hour a day/7 day a week basis. Following a lengthy period of public review and comment, Chief Daniel O'Leary proposed a more restricted use of the cameras, with the system operating on a daily basis from 10pm to 6am, while retaining the Department's discretion to use these cameras for preplanned events, criminal investigations and the other reasons listed in the previous paragraph. This revised plan also turned over one of the 12 cameras to Boston, the jurisdiction where the camera resides (Cleveland Circle).

This decision was based on a two-fold review of the CIMS program – 1) a compromised position to satisfy some residents' concerns of a "police state" where they live under 24/7 governmental surveillance and 2) an analysis of the instances where the footage proved to be most helpful to the Department and the Town in achieving our mission to reduce crime and improve the quality of life for our residents by providing assistance in investigating a crime, conducting traffic analysis, managing events, etc.

CIMS Camera Oversight Committee

Jack Corrigan

Susan Howard

Sam Scott

Ian Polumbaum